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20121201
20121231
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KQED (PBS) 20
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English 20
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
to our viewers on public television and around the globe. the government of syria appears to be losing the confidence of its most important factor. russia's envoy for medalist affairs says the rebels are gaining control -- envoy for middle east affairs says the rebels are gaining control. washington congratulated the kremlin for waking up to reality. >> the aftermath of a bombing in a damascus suburb. syrian official media said a car packed with explosives blew up near a school in this district to the southwest of the total, and that at least half of the casualties were women and children. "we were going to school when the explosion took place. i do not know anything about my parents. they may have died." this man says the victims were all students, or going to their places of work. after the explosion, the ground was full of bodies. the state news agency has blamed the violence on terrorists, its name for the rebels intensifying attacks on the government. this was the latest in a string of bombings in and around damascus. for the first time, russia has acknowledged the possibility of
into syria to secure these chemical weapons sites, but as of just today there have been no signs that any of those forces have been put on alert or there was any detail planning to do this. so there was some question here of whether assad may be calling t president's bluff. >> rose: and what exactly do you think they would be prepared to do and what would trigger that? clearly the movement of them. but it is more or less than that? >> well, u.s. intelligence officials were watching very closely the movement of syrian forces and in also trying to divine the intentions of president assad. clearly the rebels in syria have had a very good few -- past few weeks and making advances on the capital of damascus and president assad really feels like his back may be up against the wall. but is he desperate enough now to play this card which would almost certainly draw some kind of western response. >> rose: one more time, the red line is simply moving the chemical weapons? >> well, this is interesting, charlie, because the president said either moving them or using them. today secretary of state cli
and russian foreign ministers met with the u.n. envoy on syria and hillary clinton said events on the ground in syria are accelerating. she also joined the u.s. defense secretary in expressing concern that damascus is considering using chemical weapons against the rebels. >> i think there is no question that we remain very concerned, very concerned. as the opposition advances, in particular on damascus, the regime might very well consider the use of chemical weapons. >> secretary panetta went on to say that the white house made it clear there will be consequences should the assad regime make the mistake of using those weapons on its own people. for more on the perspective from damascus, i spoke a short time ago to the bbc's jeremy bolon -- jeremy bowen. >> the issue has been pretty firm on the use of chemical weapons. any news from damascus? >> i think the regime here can feel the pressure. it has been under huge pressure in the last couple of weeks, increasing pressure. of the most pressure has faced from the west, certainly, in the almost two years this has been going on. i spoke before pa
making the wrong assumptions about syria's secular state. syrian state tv was in the room to film. none of the men had been in court. all have confessed to being in al qaeda-style groups. >> the main work is making explosive devices to plant. >> they produce the algerian passport of this person, who said he was also a french citizen. >> i decided to do something for the children of syria, for the families and the powerless. i decided to join the jihad rather than crying in front of my tv. >> he would not answer when i asked if he had been tortured. two said there were part of a front which the americans might name as a terrorist group. i cannot vouch for what they said. one repeated how well they had been looked after. but a trip to district 86 in damascus explains why the regime rests them. how whites -- allowites linda into a flat's wracked by a car bomb. his sister was one of 15 killed. she blames jihad this -- jihadists. diplomats say they do operate in syria as a small part of the armed rebellion. it is turning lives upside-down and ending them. it is impossible to say what is goin
. obviously, when he comes in, iran will be a key issue. syria will be a key issue. unwinding the war from a diplomatic stand on in afghanistan. there will be this very significant agenda as he becomes the chief diplomat in the united states. >> in tackling this questions, those big issues like iran, like syria where a lot of people are calling for much tougher action, how do you think he will respond to those problems? what will be his priority? >> you were saying earlier, the contrast between john kerry and susan rice. he knows barack obama well. they served together on the senate foreign relations committee. but he does not bring the relationship into the job that susan rice would have. part of it would be sitting down with the president and determining what is, aside from world events that are already on the to do list -- where does barack obama want to make his mark in the second term? middle east peace? global warming? immigration reform? obviously, that will determine to some extent where john kerry moves going forward. >> thank you very much for joining us. as we just heard, what t
are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: we turn now to the conflict in syria. the country's neighbor, turkey, received long-sought-after defense help from nato today. the military coalition also expressed growing concerns about the assad regime's chemical weapons supply. in an all too familiar scenes of civil war, rockets blasted and fires flared overseer i can't today. far from the fighting in brussels, nato members approved turkey's request for patriot antimissile systems. they will defend against syrian shelling and rocket fire that land on the turkish side. the issue has taken on greater urgency. amid u.s. warnings that syria could be preparing to use chemical weapons against the rebels. >> the syrian stock piles of chemical weapons are a matter of great concerns. we know that syria possesses... we know they have the chemical weapons. it is a matter of urgency to ensure effective defense and protection of our ally turkey. >> woodruff: nato chief also warned of even stronger action if the syrian government crosses the chemical line. echoing monday's stateme
and representative enough of the syrian population, >> ifill: hours later, the friends of syria meeting in marrakech, morocco took the same step. the u.s. became one of 114 nations to endorse the syrian national council created just last month under international pressure. deputy secretary of state william burns: >> in a growing number of towns and villages, a new syria is being born, the regime of bashar al assad must and will go, the sooner he steps aside the better for all syrians. >> ifill: despite showing signs last week of a possible shift in russia's position, the decision did not go down well in moscow, which opposes outside action against the assad regime. foreign minister sergei lavrov: >> ( translated ): as the coalition has been recognized as the only legitimate representative, it seems that the united states decided to place all bets on the armed victory of this very national coalition. >> ifill: but no weapons have been promised, and a spokesman for the coalition said it needs real support. the u.s. has resisted sending arms, amid fears they might wind up in the hands of islamic extre
heats up, syria. >> i think the regime in damascus is approaching collapse. gwen: on the domestic front, the slow march towards the fiscal cliff continues. >> i'm pretty confident that republicans would not hold middle class taxes hostage. >> it's clear the president is just not serious about cutting spending. >> covering the week, reid wilson of "the hotline," david sanger of "the new york times," martha raddatz of abc news, and john dickerson of "slate" magazine and cbs news. >> award-winning reporting and analysis, covering history as it happens. live from our nation's capital, this is "washington week" with gwen ifill, produced in association with "national journal." corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- >> we know why we're here. to chart a greener path in the air and in our factory. >> to find cleaner, more efficient ways to power flight. >> and harness our technology for new energy solutions. >> around the globe, the people of boeing are working together to build a better tomorrow. >> that's why we're here. >> this rock has never stood still. since 1875 we've
themselves for the sake of the country. >> the presidential palace looms over damascus. syria has to futures, a political deal between all sides or a long civil war. the most likely option right now. >> the fight for syria and the special section on the web site when they first started. some of the key moment across the last two years, go to bbc.com/news for more. the venezuelan president is undergoing surgery tonight. just hours after the prime minister was arrested by the military and forced to resign, the president has announced a new prime minister. they condemned the resignation, he had plans for an intervention. the u.k. government has been explaining his plan to allow same-sex marriage to be able to choose to conduct gay marriages, but the church of england which is against the plan has banned same-sex marriages. a disturbing report was released by the u.s. with the abuse of afghan women despite laws to protect them. one of the many problems the country faces. u.s. forces, that departure comes after a great sacrifice. one of the deadly as battles took place in 2009. it was there in ea
. a report. >> a small corner of the violence that is ravaging syria every day. this is the look at a town in the north. activists maimed seven women -- named seven women and two children they say died in the rubble after bombs were dropped by aircraft. there was even greater carnage further south. a town was attacked by rebels just a few days earlier, and activists said the regime struck back with jets, firing rockets at a bread line near the bakery. the regime said its army struck back at rebel fighters year, killing and injuring many of them. hardly a good moment for the peace envoy to be visiting damascus in search of a solution. whatever may have emerged in his talks with bashar al assad, he was not giving much away. >> i briefed the president about my meetings and talks with officials in the region and beyond and about the steps i think i necessary to help the syrian people come out of this crisis. the situation in syria remains worrying. we hope all parties will be able to find a solution that meets the aspirations and hopes of the syrian people. >> as the regime loses ever more gro
. >> ifill: jeffrey brown examines new concerns over syria's chemical weapons capability and what, if anything, the u.s. can do about it. >> woodruff: from florida, hari sreenivasan has the story of endangered coral reefs. many of them dying because ocean temperatures are rising and the waters are more acidic. >> i remember seeing fields of elk horn coral that you couldn't see through it and you couldn't see beyond it and those same areas are dead you know 99% dead. ♪ >> ifill: and we close with a remembrance of jazz great dave brubeck who died today, one day shy of his 92nd birthday. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: the nation's third- largest bank, citigroup, announced big job cuts as it continues to scale back in the wake of the financial crisis. the 11,000 employees to
minister sergei lavrov and the u.n. envoy for syria, lakhdar brahimi. >> we reviewed the very mr. brahimi had his own additional information to contribute about what he is hearing from sources inside syria and both minister lavrov and i committed to support a renewed push by brahimi and his team to work with all the stakeholders in syria to begin a political transition. meanwhile, rebels in syria made the damascus international airport an official battleground. they said it's a legitimate target and they urged civilians to stay clear. fighting near the airport and around the capital city has intensified in the past week. the latest amateur video showed street battles and a car set afire by a rocket attack. the exiled leader of hamas khaled meshaal entered gaza today for the first time. it was, in part, a show of defiance after the militant group's latest clash with israel. we have a report narrated by jonathan rugman of "independent television news." >> reporter: he crossed the border from egypt with tears in his eyes. the leader of hamas setting foot on palestinian territory for the firs
to sing us a patriotic song, but she was soon overwhelmed by the general chant, "god, syria, bashar al-assad." asked tow draw a picture, this little artist came up with tanks and guns in the colors of the government flag. this is one of several shelters across damascus for people displaced by the fighting. >> ( translated ): the reason we're doing this is because we've seen what happens to syrians who have to leave the country for refugee camps. they're treated very badly. we don't want that to happen again. >> reporter: they may wear anoraks, but they claim anywhere here is welcome, whatever their political affiliation. perhaps, predictably, we couldn't find anyone here who said they support 9 rebels. one said, "any opportunity to go home would be lethal." >> ( translated ): they threaten me. if i go back, because i did not go to partly to mostly there, because i support the president. >> reporter: in a place where assad's senior and junior stare down, as families eat, one man still wouldn't speak openly, even in denouncing the rebels in a place like that. >> ( translated ): sometimes
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)

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